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portion of the program will be moderated by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 14 when his family emigrated from cuba under harrowing circumstances, including last minute detention by the secret police. he made it here. in two lines -- and two lines come to mind when i think of him. "this is my country, land of my choice. this is my country, here i found voice." what a voice it is. he earned his aba at the university of florida and he is now in their hall of fame. he is a partner in the miami office of the national law firm. his clients range from former vice president al gore to philip morris, to the nation
at our annual meeting. it tells people going to law school exactly what they are in for and you need to understand that the accreditation part of the american bar association is under a completely separate organization as a result of an agreement we have with the department of justice and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much t
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
. and then the sheriff vowing to defie president obama's gun laws. i have a few questions for him. >>> and he missed the inauguration. but willard is in washington today. and he made some news. there's a big friday show coming, so stay with us. ♪ even this i can stand ♪ i want to keep you any way i can ♪ ♪ ain't too proud to beg, sweet darling ♪ ♪ don't leave me girl ♪ don't you go ♪ ain't to proud to please baby ♪ ♪ please don't leave me girl ♪ don't you go ♪ oh, oh, oh . >>> have you joined the "politics nation" conversation on facebook yet? we hope you will. we asked our facebook fans to give advice to republicans on how they can stop being the stupid party, as bobby jindal suggested. sydney said it's time to care about others. dred says the gop needs to explain how their big business views can help the average man if they can. joy says start by helping the mirn people, which is what you were e lelected to do. we want to hear your advice, too. please head over to facebook and join "politics nation" and like us to follow the conversation that keeps going long after the show
to defie president obama's gun laws. i have a few questions for him. >>> and he missed the inauguration. but willard is in washington today. and he made some news. there's a big friday show coming, so stay with us. ♪ even this i can stand ♪ i want to keep you any way i can ♪ ♪ ain't too proud to beg, sweet darling ♪ ♪ don't leave me girl ♪ don't you go ♪ ain't to proud to please baby ♪ ♪ please don't leave me girl ♪ don't you go ♪ oh, oh, oh looer nobody insures more bikes than progressive. do you guys ride? well... no. sometimes, yeah. yes. well, if you know anybody else who also rides, send them here -- we got great coverage. it's not like bikers love their bikes more than life itself. i doubt anyone will even notice. leading the pack in motorcycle insurance. now, that's progressive. call or click today. aarrggh! . >>> have you joined the "politics nation" conversation on facebook yet? we hope you will. we asked our facebook fans to give advice to republicans on how they can stop being the stupid party, as bobby jindal suggested. sydney said it's time to care a
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
. the nra has been clear thought would meet any gun laws with serious resistance. >> they are getting the message out rncht president's kids more important than yours? why is he skeptical but putting armed security in schools when his kids are protected at their schools? >> jon: and why does he get to veto bills and command an army when we don't? all right so the conversation has started and we're off to a deplorable start. [ laughter ] i swear to you if i didn't know any better and i'm not a big conspiracy guy, i would think the nra is an elaborate after vant geard joaquin phoenix style joke or a false flag operation run by michael moore in an attempt to discredit responsible gun owners. your response, mr. president. >> i believe the second amendment guarantees an individual right to bear arms. i believe most gun owners agree we can respect the second amendment while keeping an irresponsible law breaking few from inflicting harm on a massive scale. >> jon: interesting open on his part. i thought he was going to say if you bring up my kids again i'll drum strike you're (bleep) to king
a more abundant california. as legislators, it's your duty and privilege to pass laws. what we need to do for our future will require producing hundreds of new laws each year. the great writer of the 16th century wisely wrote, there is little relation between our actions, which are in perpetball mutation. the most desirable laws are the rarest, simplest and most general. think it would be better to have none at all than in such numbers as we have. constantly expanding the coercive power of government by adding each year so many minute prescriptions to detailed legal system overshadows other aspects of public service. individual creativity and direct leadership must also play a part. we do this not by commanding thou shall or thou shall not but to organize people. lay the ten commandments next to the education code and you'll see how far we diverged in approaching content to that forms the basis of our legal system. in the right order of things, education, the early fashioning of character and the formation of conscience, comes before legislation. nothing is more determinant of our future
and you'll hear from our studio audience, a former law enforcement official, gun rights activists who know firsthand why so many americans have chosen to arm themselves in order to protect their families. first, let's recap what was proposed earlier this we thiek. in addition, the president outlined legislative proposals and calling for the passage of a universal background check, something that critics say could lead to a gun ordinance data base and wants the assault weapons ban reinstated, an a ten round limit on magazines, and restrictions on bullets that can be possessed and manufactured and discussed a new gun trafficking law that penalizes those who help criminals obtain firearms, on wednesday, the americans called on americans to pressure their ehe lekted representatives in supporting these measures. let's take a look. >> get them on record, ask your member of congress if they support universal background checks to keep guns out of the wrong hands, ask if they support a ban on military style assault weapons and high capacity magazines, if they say no, ask them why not. ask them what
to become law, it would have to pass the republican-controlled house of representatives. speaker boehner will allow it to come up with a vote. we want to talk about this. joining us from maryland, the democratic state senator of montgomery county and corey stewart, republican chairman of the prince william county bord of supervisors. chairman stewart, i want to start with you. you have been a longtime voice on the immigration debate, saying mainly that local and state governments have carried the bulk of issues. how do you see this today? is the federal government stepping up in your view? >> the federal government has no credibility with regard to immigration reform and enforcement. why would we believe that washington is going to enforce new immigration law if it's not enforcing the current law? every day, thousands of criminal illegal aliens are aphandied -- apprehended by local law enforcement, they contact i.c.e. and i.c.e. directs them to release the criminal aliens. there is no reason to believe that if we pass the reform willing, they're going to change anything, they're going to
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is accep
by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program for lower income americans. it's an important program. as governor, i dealt with it in my state, but when i was governor, it was 8% of the state budget. today it's 26% of the state budget. it's soaking up every dollar or almost every dollar that would go to higher education. as a result, students around the country are wondering well, why are my tuition fees going up? it's because of washington's medicaid program requiring states to make decisions that soak uponey that otherwise would go for colleges and universities. in our state of tennessee, 30 years ago, the state paid 70% of the cost of going to the university of tennessee. today it pays 30%, and medicaid is the chief culprit. now, everyone knows this. i mean, the president's own debt commission has told him this and suggested a way to deal with it. 40 or 50 of us on both sides of the aisle have bee
like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to unanother must be equal, as well. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright, young students and engineers are listed in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. we know that america thrives when every person can find independence and pride in their work. when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed when a little girl born in to the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else. >> and joining me now with his reaction to the president's speech yesterday, democratic congressman from maryland, chris van hollen. thank you so much for your time. >> it's great to be with you, tamron. >> as have perhaps read yourself or heard "the new york times" is calling the president's unapologetic, evolved. we ask the question, is this the liberal reagan? what is your thoughts on this
coming together of law enforcement, educators and industry and a variety of other folks and nonprofits organizations and really understand the issue and dive into it. it's been awesome and a ton of learning has gone into this. alice is amazing. everything that happened with time warner and got together a year ago and partnered up on this and wouldn't it be great if we got two major media organizations together, one traditional media which has a a lot of strength in eaching people via tv and one reaching people socially and if you could gather these together imagine what we can do? and so i think you called sizzle real. it was a sizzling experience to be in a high school in hare land and felt like a football pep rally but it was about bullying and they all took the pledge to stop it when they see it and amazing experience and tip of the hat to time warner to really understanding the issue and putting the weight of the media empire behind it to reach people, and second of all understanding how you sort -- there is the bully and there is the person being bullied but what if we got the
suspension of the tobacco sales permit. the reason for suspension, violation of state law and the san francisco health code which proprohibit the indoor smoking of tobacco products. director's case no. smk12-09 and we'll start with the appellant. you have seven minutes >> good evening, my name is bashir shahin, the owner of marrakech restaurant. thank you to the board of appeals for giving us a chance to express our thoughts and feelings. i am not here to argue or ask for anything unreasonable. just hoping that you will give us some leniency andtry to give us some mercy on this case, which is a small family business, trying to keep our doors open. we have been in business for the last 16 years. i have clean record with all departments. for the last few years we have been hit very hard by the recession and economy and it's been hard to keep our doors as well. we like to comply with the ordinance, with any laws that come through. just this particular matter is kind of confusing and that is why we got into this argument. and we're hoping to resolve it and get better results from this.
law enforcement only focused on investigation. chief suhr recognize importance of having advocacy groups located directly in the special victims unit. family can meet with investigators and have access to services in the system as they move forward. with the efforts of kathy black and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforcement agencies across the region who actively participate in the sil
of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this issue. a five minute presentation is not sufficient to that and my colleague will speak on the details of this. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you m
. all of that talk about coffee and the gentleman talking about going through law school in the '70s and i can relate to that experience going through night school. having a hard time trying to stay awake during procedures class. i recall a professor making key points and one thing he always said, you should always examine the issue of jurisdiction. i have two primary points on that issue. today as indicated or foreshadowed by brief the appellant decided to file an exemption and declare that they are going to be bond on the jurisdiction of the state of california. the california massage therapy council. i have that, if you could bring up the projector, please? it was filed today. >> what is this document sorry, i missed what you said it was. >> it's entitled -- this first one -- there is two of them. i'm sorry. for a state certified massage establishment. as you can see it's in order and has been received by environmental health section. there is also -- this actually goes to the planning department, but you file it through the health department. there is also a companion doc
of executive orders does seem extraordinary. paul bagoalo working for president clinton stroke of the pen law of the land kind of cool. >> this is a president that i think has gone way beyond that in terms of the number of regulations that have come out under this administration in what are called significant regulations which have an impact of over $100 million. those are the things hurting our economy making it harder to get people back to work and making it harder for hard-working taxpayers. >> to be fair to president obama he's not the first to do this by any means even george washington did this, teddy roosevelt did many more nixon's wage and price control executive order. peace corps is an executive order. there is precedent. >> there is but if you go back to the founding fathers if men are angels we wouldn't need laws. that's why they set up a checks and balance system of government and the president doesn't appear to believe that applies to him. >> i go back to our first president as i look at an inauguration, george washington said that political parties are likely in the course of t
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that i
with the review of the department general order log which is a law with basic details, not a lot of activities that and i want to thank lieutenant gracie that went out of her way to meet the commissioners and we get a chance to review it and i appreciate that and it's done regally and i want to recognize the department's work in doing that. also we received a letter about meetings with the community and wondered if the chief wanted to give some comment on that. looks like there was a meeting in june. >> i think these were the meetings that preceded the ordinance. >> okay thank you. >> any further questions? dr. marshall. >> just because i heard this come up before and i want to reiterate what you said and what commissioner mazzucco said regarding this issue the chief said a number of times in public. i don't know how many times you need to say it chief. he stated how officers are handled with this issue. i just want the public to be reassured when the chief says that's the way it is that's the way it is. >> okay. thank you. >> thank you. oh public comment. >> we're still going on presenta
has become inefficient. law enforcement needs to be one component along with courts and treatment programs and reentry program in preventing drug abuse and with crime and family break down. this is way from [inaudible] focusing on dealers. there are law enforcement alternatives for the sfpd to consider. i wanted to mention one and a pilot program in seattle washington that could be used as an alternative and small time drug dealers are deterred into community services rather than jail. the approach has been successful in the united kingdom. whether african-americans deal drugs at 18 times of the population or seven times the rate in other cities is maybe increasingly irrelevant. the gap of what race gets arrested from selling drugs and what race dies from using drugs is significant and requires a balanced approach and the city needs to transition to policies reducing drug abuse. over the past decade san francisco law enforcement has prioritizing arresting drug dealers over consumers and focus on the drug dealing likely done by minorities. the choices have not searched san fr
. . . in the wake of his suicide california representative has proposed aaron's law, which is a federal bill that would decriminalize portions of the computer fraud and abuse act. it could be a small step in reforming our country's overreaching cyber laws. and it's beyond unfortunately that it took the loss of one of our brightest computer programmers to bring this issue tonight. professor aaron schwartz. he's also a professor of law and the director of the center for ethics at harvard university. he is joining us tonight from austin, texas. larry, i would like to welcome you back inside "the war room." >> it's great to be back. >> jennifer: yeah, you knew aaron for 12 years, i'm told and as his mentor and friend -- i'll get to the legal stuff -- but i'm curious what you would like people to remember about him. >> well, i really think of him as the mentor and me as the mentoree. he was around 14 when i first met him, and every single stage of his life, he was pushing people to -- to try to build something that was -- that fit the ideas that he had about what the inter
, local law enforcement, local da's, people who are getting out of their lanes. the old paradigm of a da and a attorney and a police officer, you get bad guys, you put them this jail. you know, i'm telling you, i've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the cou
inability as a civil society, a nation that takes such great pride in the rule of law, to in some way come to grips with the mace of of guns and violence -- with the place of guns and violence. and before we begin this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
and we decided that we would call it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might refle
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,920 (some duplicates have been removed)